live footage of the Quintet of the Hot Club of France – J’attendrai (1939)

The Quintet of the Hot Cub of France

The Quintet of the Hot Club of France was an acoustic string band formed by violinist Stéphane Grappelli and gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt in 1934. The group made hundreds of recordings before World War II. The group split up when the war started and got back together after the war in 1946. They played together until Django Reinhardt’s untimely death in 1953.

Here is a rare video of the quintet performing the tune J’attendrai a popular French song first recorded by Rina Ketty in 1938. It became a big hit during World War II. Listen to Grappell’s smooth lyrical style of playing and watch Reinhardt’s impressive finger work with his two working fingers of his left hand. The remaining three fingers were bent and unusable because of burns he suffered in a caravan fire when he was 18. Django Reinhardt had to re-learn how to play the guitar.

Django Reinhardt plays violin and guitar

Django Reinhardt (1910-1953)

Django Reinhardt was a gypsy guitarist famous for co-founding the Quintet of the Hot Club of France with jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli in 1934. He made hundreds of recordings with the Quintet. Django also recorded with saxophonist Coleman Hawkins, jazz violinist Eddie South, and lots of other jazz musicians in Europe and America.

During World War II the quintet split up. Django lived in Paris throughout the war and managed to avoid getting sent to a concentration camp. He kept on playing and recording.

Here are 4 rare Django Reinhardt recordings made in Belgium in 1942. These recordings are unusual because Django Reinhardt is accompanied by stride piano (stride piano was a form of jazz piano popular during the 1920s). Django plays solos on the guitar and violin accompanied on the piano by Ivon de Bie. He is famous for his virtuosic jazz guitar solos but violin was his first instrument. I hope that you enjoy this music.

“I Can’t Give You Anything But Love,” and “After You’ve Gone” Freddy Taylor (singer), Quintet of the Hot Club of France

Freddy Taylor

Freddy Taylor was a jazz singer, trumpet player, band leader, guitarist, and dancer. He came to Paris from New York with the Lucky Millander orchestra on a tour in 1933. He worked with the orchestra for about a decade. During that time he took trumpet lessons from Bill Coleman. While he was in Paris in the 1930s, Freddy met up with Django Reinhardt and the Quintet of the Hot Club of France. They made recordings together. Freddy Taylor also had his own group called Freddy Taylor and His Swing Men from Harlem. In the 1940s Freddy came back to the U.S.A. and continued performing until the late 1960s.

The Quintet of the Hot Club of France

The Quintet of the Hot Club of France was formed by gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grapelli in 1934. During the period before World War 2 the group was very popular and made hundreds of recordings. In the war years Django and Stephane split up and played with other groups. They met up again briefly after World War 2 and made some more recordings. Django Reinhardt died in 1953 and the group was disbanded. Stephane Grappelli had some difficult times and in the 1970s he became popular again. He performed and recorded with lots of musicians (jazz and classical) and toured around the world until his death in 1996.

“I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” is a popular jazz standard.  Django Reinhardt, the Quintet of the Hot Club of France and jazz singer Freddy Taylor recorded it in 1947.  Here is their recording of “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love.” Enjoy.

“After You’ve Gone” is a popular jazz standard written in 1918 by Turner Layton.  Henry Creamer wrote the lyrics.  Django Reinhardt recorded “After You’ve Gone” three times (in 1934, 1936, and 1949).  Here is a recording of the song by Django Reinhardt, the Quintet of the Hot Club of France and jazz singer Freddy Taylor.  Enjoy.

 

Quintet of the Hot Club of France – After You’ve Gone

The Quintet of the Hot Club of France

The Quintet of the Hot Club of France was a string jazz group made up of three guitars, a violin, and a bass.  It was originally formed in 1934 after a series of informal backstage jam sessions. The quintet was a unique jazz group because it was made up of an interesting combination of instruments and it invented a style of jazz known as “gypsy jazz” or “hot jazz.”  Over the years the quintet went through many different rhythm guitarists and bass players but the two main players (Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli) remained the same.  From 1934 until the beginning of the war in 1939 the quintet made hundreds of recordings and toured Europe many times.  The quintet was disbanded in 1939.  In 1946 Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt teamed up together again and formed another quintet.  This post-war quintet lasted from 1946 until 1948.

Here is a recording of the jazz standard “After You’ve Gone” performed by the Quintet of the Hot Club of France.  The singer in the recording is Freddy Taylor.

The Quintet of the Hot Club of France – The Sheik of Araby

The Quintet of the Hot Club of France

The Quintet of the Hot Club of France was a string jazz group made up of three guitars, a violin, and a bass.  It was originally formed in 1934 after a series of informal backstage jam sessions. The quintet was a unique jazz group because it was made up of an interesting combination of instruments and it invented a style of jazz known as “gypsy jazz” or “hot jazz.”  Over the years the quintet went through many different rhythm guitarists and bass players but the two main players (Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli) remained the same.  From 1934 until the beginning of the war in 1939 the quintet made hundreds of recordings and toured Europe many times.  The quintet was disbanded in 1939.  In 1946 Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt teamed up together again and formed another quintet.  This post-war quintet lasted from 1946 until 1948.

Here is a recording done by the Quintet of the Hot Club of France in 1937 of a jazz standard called the “Sheik of Araby.”  Enjoy!

Django Reinhardt & Eddie South – Somebody Loves Me – Paris, 23.11.1937

Eddie South (1904-1962) was a black American jazz violinist.  He has been referred to as the “Black Angel” of the violin.  Eddie was a child prodigy who was trained as a classical violinist.  He later switched to jazz violin because there were more opportunities for black musicians in jazz than in classical music.

In the 1920s Eddie visited Europe and was influenced by Hungarian folk music and gypsy music that he heard.  He later incorporated Hungarian music and gypsy music into his style of playing.

In the 1930s Eddie performed and made recordings with guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli of the Quintet of the Hot Club of France.

Here is a recording of Eddie South and Django Reinhardt playing “Somebody Loves Me.”  The recording was made in Paris in 1937.

Eddie South (violin) and Django Reinhardt (guitar) :

You can find mp3 recordings of Django Reinhardt and Eddie South on the website http://www.Amazon.com. The piece ‘Somebody Loves Me’ is also on the cd Classics and Rarities: Django Reinhardt which can also be found on http://www.Amazon.com.